EU Interest Rate 2023

EU Interest Rate

In the past ten years, the European Union (EU) economy has experienced a period of economic growth, but also faced several challenges, such as the debt crisis in some EU countries, Brexit and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

The EU economy has grown at a moderate pace, with an average annual growth rate of around 1.5-2% in the past decade. However, the growth has been uneven among EU countries, with some countries, such as Germany and the Netherlands, performing better than others, such as Greece and Italy.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past decade, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The EU economy has faced several challenges in the past decade, the most significant of which was the debt crisis that affected several EU countries, particularly those in the Eurozone. This crisis was caused by a combination of factors, such as high levels of government debt, large budget deficits, and weak economic growth. The EU and the ECB have implemented various measures to address the crisis, such as providing financial assistance to affected countries and implementing structural reforms.

The Brexit vote in 2016 and the UK’s withdrawal from the EU also had a significant impact on the EU economy, as the UK is a major trading partner and a member of the single market. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has also had a severe impact on the EU economy, leading to a sharp contraction in economic activity and high levels of unemployment in some countries.

Overall, the EU economy has grown moderately in the past decade, but has also faced significant challenges, such as the debt crisis, Brexit and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic which caused a severe contraction in economic activity.

 

In the Euro Area, benchmark interest rate is set by the Governing Council of the European Central Bank. The primary objective of the ECB’s monetary policy is to maintain price stability which is to keep inflation below, but close to 2 percent over the medium term. In times of prolonged low inflation and low interest rates, ECB may also adopt non-standard monetary policy measures, such as asset purchase programmes. The official interest rate is the Main refinancing operations rate.
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Euro

The European Central Bank (ECB) sets the interest rate for the European Union (EU) and the Eurozone. The official interest rate, also known as the “main refinancing rate,” is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks in the Eurozone. The ECB’s main goal is to maintain price stability, which is defined as inflation below, but close to, 2% over the medium term.

Over the past twenty years, the ECB has set interest rates at various levels, depending on the economic conditions at the time. In the early 2000s, the interest rate was at a relatively high level, around 4%, as the ECB sought to curb inflation that had risen above 2% in the late 1990s. During the financial crisis of 2008 and the following years, the ECB lowered interest rates to near zero to support the recovery of the Eurozone economy.

In the past decade, the ECB has kept interest rates low, around 0% to 0.25%, as the Eurozone has struggled with low inflation and slow economic growth. The ECB has also launched a series of unconventional monetary policy measures, such as quantitative easing, to support the economy.

As for the Euro, over the past 20 years, it has generally been considered a strong currency. The Euro has fluctuated in value against other currencies, but has generally been able to maintain its value and stability. However, the Euro has faced some challenges, such as the sovereign debt crisis in some Eurozone countries, which led to a decline in the value of the Euro against other currencies.

EU Economy

The European Union (EU) economy is the second largest economy in the world and is made up of 27 member countries. The EU operates as a single market, allowing for the free movement of goods, services, people, and capital among member countries. This has led to increased trade and investment among member countries and has made the EU economy more integrated and interdependent.

The EU economy is diverse and complex, with different countries at different stages of economic development and with different economic structures. Some EU countries, such as Germany and the Netherlands, have large and advanced industrial sectors, while others, such as Greece and Portugal, have smaller and less developed industrial sectors.

The EU economy is characterized by a high level of openness to trade, with exports and imports accounting for a significant share of GDP. The EU is also a major destination for foreign direct investment, with many large multinational companies based in the EU.

The EU economy is also characterized by a high level of regulation and a strong welfare state, with many EU countries providing universal healthcare, education and social security. The EU has several institutions, such as the European Central Bank (ECB) and the European Commission, that play important roles in the functioning of the EU economy, such as monetary policy, competition policy, and trade policy.

Overall, the EU economy is diverse and complex, with a high level of trade and investment, a high level of regulation, and a strong welfare state. However, the EU economy has also faced several challenges in recent years, such as the debt crisis, Brexit, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic which has caused a severe contraction in economic activity in many EU countries.

EU Major Industries

The European Union (EU) has a diverse and complex economy, with many different industries. Some of the major industries in the EU include:

  • Automotive: The EU is home to many large and influential automotive companies, such as Volkswagen, BMW, and Renault. The automotive industry is a major employer and generates billions of euros in revenue.

  • Manufacturing: The EU has a large and advanced manufacturing sector, with a particular focus on high-tech and high-value-added products, such as machinery, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals.

  • Services: The services sector is a major contributor to the EU economy, accounting for a large share of GDP and employment. The services sector includes a wide range of businesses, such as finance, insurance, and real estate, as well as tourism and hospitality.

  • Energy: The EU has a large and diversified energy sector, with a particular focus on renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power. The EU is also a major importer of oil and gas.

  • Agriculture and food: The EU has a large and productive agriculture and food sector, which is a major exporter of agricultural products, such as wine, cheese, and meat.

  • Construction: The construction industry plays a vital role in building and maintaining the physical infrastructure of the EU, such as roads, bridges, and buildings.

  • Retail: Retail industry plays a vital role in the distribution of goods and services and also providing employment for millions of people.

  • Technology: The EU is home to many large and influential technology companies and has a large and growing technology sector, including software, hardware, and communications equipment.

  • Healthcare: The EU healthcare sector is one of the largest industries in the EU economy and is a major contributor to the economy, providing employment for millions of people and generating billions of euros in revenue.

Overall, the EU economy is diverse and complex, with many different industries that play important roles in the EU economy.

EU Automotive Sector

The automotive industry is a major sector of the European Union (EU) economy, with many large and influential automotive companies based in the EU, such as Volkswagen, BMW, and Renault. The industry is a significant employer and generates billions of euros in revenue.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The automotive industry is affected by many factors, such as consumer demand, technological advancements, and competition. Consumer demand plays a key role in the automotive industry, as it affects the demand for cars and trucks. The industry is also heavily affected by technological advancements, such as electric and autonomous vehicles, which can change the way cars and trucks are made and used. The automotive industry is also heavily affected by competition, as companies must compete for customers and market share. The industry is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the automotive sector.

EU Manufacturing Sector

The manufacturing industry is a large and important sector of the European Union (EU) economy, with a particular focus on high-tech and high-value-added products, such as machinery, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The industry is a significant employer and generates billions of euros in revenue.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The manufacturing industry is affected by many factors, such as consumer demand, technological advancements, and competition. Consumer demand plays a key role in the manufacturing industry, as it affects the demand for manufactured goods. The industry is also heavily affected by technological advancements, such as automation, which can change the way goods are made and used. The manufacturing industry is also heavily affected by competition, as companies must compete for customers and market share. The industry is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the manufacturing sector.

EU Services Sector

The services sector is a major contributor to the European Union (EU) economy, accounting for a large share of GDP and employment. The services sector includes a wide range of businesses, such as finance, insurance, and real estate, as well as tourism and hospitality.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The services sector is affected by many factors, such as consumer demand, technological advancements, and competition. Consumer demand plays a key role in the services sector, as it affects the demand for services. The sector is also affected by technological advancements, such as digitalization, which can change the way services are delivered and consumed. The services sector is also affected by competition, as companies must compete for customers and market share. The sector is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the services sector.

EU Energy Sector

The energy sector is a large and important sector of the European Union (EU) economy, with a focus on diversifying its energy sources and reducing its dependence on fossil fuels. The EU has set a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase the share of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, in its overall energy mix.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The energy sector is affected by many factors, such as energy prices, government regulations, and technological advancements. Energy prices, particularly the price of oil, can greatly affect the cost of producing and distributing energy. The sector is also affected by government regulations, such as environmental regulations and policies related to renewable energy. Technological advancements, such as the development of new renewable energy technologies, can change the way energy is produced and consumed. The sector is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the energy sector.

EU Agriculture Sector

The agriculture sector is an important sector of the European Union (EU) economy, with a large and productive agriculture and food sector, which is a major exporter of agricultural products, such as wine, cheese, and meat. The EU has a common agricultural policy (CAP) that provides a framework for the production, marketing and distribution of agricultural products, ensuring a stable supply of safe, high-quality food at fair prices.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The agriculture sector is affected by many factors, such as weather conditions, government policies, and global market conditions. Weather conditions can greatly affect crop yields and prices, and government policies such as subsidies and tariffs can affect the competitiveness of the sector. The global market conditions such as supply and demand for agricultural products, exchange rates, and trade agreements can also affect the sector. The sector is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the agriculture sector.

It should be noted that the EU’s common agricultural policy (CAP) plays a significant role in the EU agriculture sector, the CAP is designed to support farmers and ensure a stable supply of high-quality food at fair prices. The CAP provides subsidies and other forms of financial support to farmers, as well as setting standards for food safety and quality. The CAP also regulates the production and marketing of agricultural products, and is designed to ensure a fair income for farmers, while also protecting the environment and preserving rural communities.

It’s worth mentioning that the CAP is facing some criticism, as the subsidies can be seen as distorting the market and creating an uneven playing field for EU farmers. However, the EU is continuously trying to reform the policy to make it more effective and sustainable.

In general, the EU agriculture sector is a vital sector for the EU economy, providing food security, employment and preserving rural communities, and it is continuously adapting to the challenges and opportunities arising from changing market conditions and technological advancements.

 

EU Construction Sector

The construction sector is a major sector of the European Union (EU) economy, as it plays a vital role in building and maintaining the physical infrastructure of the EU, such as roads, bridges, buildings, and housing. The construction sector is a significant employer and generates billions of euros in revenue.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The construction sector is affected by many factors, such as consumer demand, technological advancements, and competition. Consumer demand plays a key role in the construction sector, as it affects the demand for new construction projects. The sector is also affected by technological advancements, such as new building materials and construction techniques. The construction sector is also affected by competition, as companies must compete for contracts and market share. The sector is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the construction sector.

It is worth noting that the EU construction sector is also affected by government policies and regulations, such as building codes, zoning laws, and environmental regulations. These policies and regulations can impact the cost and feasibility of construction projects, as well as the materials and techniques that can be used.

Additionally, the EU construction sector is also facing some challenges, such as the shortage of skilled labor, and the need for sustainable and energy-efficient construction. The EU is continuously promoting policies and initiatives to address these challenges and promote sustainable construction, and the use of digital technologies in the construction process, such as BIM (Building Information Modeling) and digital twins.

Overall, the EU construction sector is a significant contributor to the EU economy, providing employment and supporting economic growth, but it is also facing some challenges that need to be addressed to ensure its long-term sustainability.

 

EU Retail Sector

The retail sector is a major sector of the European Union (EU) economy, as it plays a vital role in the distribution and sale of goods to consumers. The retail sector includes a wide range of businesses, such as supermarkets, department stores, and online retailers. The retail sector is a significant employer and generates billions of euros in revenue.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The retail sector is affected by many factors, such as consumer demand, technological advancements, and competition. Consumer demand plays a key role in the retail sector, as it affects the demand for goods. The sector is also affected by technological advancements, such as online shopping and e-commerce, which have changed the way goods are sold and delivered. The retail sector is also affected by competition, as companies must compete for customers and market share. The sector is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the retail sector.

It’s worth noting that the EU retail sector has been facing some challenges in recent years, such as the rise of e-commerce and the shift towards online shopping, which has led to a decline in physical store sales. Additionally, the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated this trend and has put pressure on traditional brick-and-mortar retailers.

The retail sector is also affected by consumer sentiment and purchasing power, which can be impacted by economic conditions such as unemployment and GDP growth. The sector is also affected by government regulations and policies, such as consumer protection laws and data privacy regulations.

The EU is continuously working to support the retail sector and adapt to the changing market conditions, through policies and initiatives that promote digitalization and innovation, and addressing the challenges faced by the sector.

Overall, the EU retail sector is a significant contributor to the EU economy, providing employment and supporting economic growth, but it is also facing some challenges that need to be addressed to ensure its long-term sustainability.

EU Technology Sector

The technology sector is a major sector of the European Union (EU) economy, as it plays a vital role in driving innovation and productivity across the economy. The technology sector includes a wide range of businesses, such as software development, hardware manufacturing, and telecommunications. The technology sector is a significant employer and generates billions of euros in revenue.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The technology sector is affected by many factors, such as innovation and advancements, global competition and market demand. Innovation and advancements in technology play a key role in the sector, as they drive productivity, efficiency, and new business opportunities. The sector is also affected by global competition, as companies must compete for market share and customers. The technology sector is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the technology sector.

It’s worth noting that the EU technology sector has been facing some challenges in recent years, such as the need for digital skills and the need for data protection and privacy. The EU is continuously working to support the technology sector and adapt to the changing market conditions, through policies and initiatives that promote digitalization, innovation, and addressing the challenges faced by the sector.

Additionally, the EU technology sector is also facing challenges such as the need to increase the level of investment in research and development, the need to improve access to funding and venture capital, and the need to increase the level of collaboration between industry, academia, and government. The EU has been working to address these challenges through initiatives such as the European Innovation Council (EIC) and the Digital Single Market (DSM) strategy.

The EU technology sector is also affected by trade policies and regulations, such as tariffs, intellectual property rights and data privacy regulations. The EU is also working to establish a level playing field for EU technology companies to compete globally, by negotiating trade agreements and promoting international cooperation.

Overall, the EU technology sector is a significant contributor to the EU economy, providing employment and supporting economic growth, but it is also facing some challenges that need to be addressed to ensure its long-term sustainability.

EU Healthcare Sector

The healthcare sector is a major sector of the European Union (EU) economy, as it plays a vital role in ensuring the health and well-being of the EU population. The healthcare sector includes a wide range of businesses and organizations, such as hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, and medical device manufacturers. The healthcare sector is a significant employer and generates billions of euros in revenue.

Inflation in the EU has been relatively stable over the past few years, with an average rate of around 1.5%. The European Central Bank (ECB), which is the central bank of the EU, has a target rate of inflation at close to but below 2% and has used monetary policy tools such as setting interest rates to achieve this target.

The interest rate is the rate at which the ECB lends money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation. The ECB sets the interest rate based on the inflation rate, economic growth, and unemployment rate.

The healthcare sector is affected by many factors, such as demographics, technological advancements, and government policies. Demographics, such as an aging population, increase the demand for healthcare services. Technological advancements, such as new treatments and medical devices, can improve the quality and accessibility of healthcare services. Government policies, such as healthcare reform and regulations, can affect the funding and delivery of healthcare services. The sector is also affected by the interest rate and inflation, as higher interest rates and inflation can increase the cost of borrowing and production, which can reduce the level of investment and economic growth in the healthcare sector.

It’s worth noting that the EU healthcare sector has been facing some challenges in recent years, such as the sustainability of healthcare systems, access to affordable and high-quality healthcare, and the need for healthcare innovation. The EU is continuously working to support the healthcare sector and adapt to the changing market conditions, through policies and initiatives that promote innovation, sustainability, and addressing the challenges faced by the sector.

It’s also worth mentioning that the healthcare sector in the EU is highly regulated and governed by EU laws and regulations, such as the Medical Devices Regulation and the In-vitro Diagnostics Regulation, which are designed to ensure the safety and quality of healthcare products and services. The EU also works to improve cooperation and coordination among member states in the area of healthcare, through initiatives such as the EU Health Programme and the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the healthcare sector in the EU, leading to increased demand for healthcare services, as well as challenges related to the availability and distribution of personal protective equipment, testing and treatment options, and vaccination strategies. The EU has been working closely with member states to address these challenges and ensure the continuity of healthcare services during the pandemic.

Overall, the EU healthcare sector is a critical aspect of the EU economy and society, providing essential services and contributing to the overall well-being of EU citizens. The EU is committed to supporting the healthcare sector and addressing the challenges it faces in order to ensure its long-term sustainability and effectiveness.

Interest Rate - World

Inflation and interest rates vary around the world, depending on the economic conditions and monetary policies of each country.

Interest rates are crucial to day traders in the forex market. That’s because the higher the rate of return, the more interest accrued on currency invested.

Generally, higher interest rates increase the value of a country’s currency. Higher interest rates tend to attract foreign investment, increasing the demand for and value of the home country’s currency. Conversely, lower interest rates tend to be unattractive for foreign investment and decrease the currency’s relative value.

Go to below pages to find out more about individual country’s current interest rate and historical interest rates.

The inflation and interest rate in 2022 will be affected by a variety of factors such as global economic growth, government monetary policies, and global events such as COVID-19 pandemic.

In general, the inflation rate is the rate at which the general level of prices for goods and services is rising and subsequently purchasing power is falling. Central banks use monetary policy to control inflation by adjusting interest rates, which can affect the economy by making borrowing more or less expensive.

Interest rate is the rate at which central banks lend money to commercial banks, which in turn affects the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. Central banks use interest rate to control inflation, by making borrowing more expensive, it reduces the level of spending and inflation.

It is important to note that the inflation and interest rate can vary from country to country, and it is determined by the monetary policies of the central bank of each country. It’s also important to note that the global events can have a significant impact on the inflation and interest rate.

Inflation is generally measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which tracks the changes in the price of a basket of goods and services that are commonly consumed by households. The average inflation rate for advanced economies is around 2%, but it can vary from country to country. Some countries, such as Venezuela, have experienced hyperinflation in recent years, while others, such as Japan, have struggled with deflation.

Interest rates are set by the central banks of each country and are used as a monetary policy tool to control inflation and stabilize the economy. Central banks will raise interest rates to slow down inflation and lower interest rates to increase inflation. The average interest rate for advanced economies is around 2%, but it can also vary from country to country. Some countries, such as the United States, have raised interest rates to combat inflation, while others, such as Japan, have kept interest rates low to stimulate economic growth.

It’s important to note that the global events such as pandemics, trade tensions, geopolitical risks and etc, can have a significant impact on the inflation and interest rate.

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Payment services for HUBFX UK and US are provided by The Currency Cloud Limited. Registered in England No. 06323311. Registered Office: Stewardship Building 1st Floor, 12 Steward Street London E1 6FQ. The Currency Cloud Limited is authorised by the Financial Conduct Authority under the Electronic Money Regulations 2011 for the issuing of electronic money (FRN: 900199) and The Currency Cloud Inc. which operates in partnership with Community Federal Savings Bank (CFSB) to facilitate payments in all 50 states in the US. CFSB is registered with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC Certificate# 57129). The Currency Cloud Inc is registered with FinCEN and authorized in 39 states to transmit money (MSB Registration Number: 31000160311064). Registered Office: 104 5th Avenue, 20th Floor, New York , NY 10011 

 

Payment services for HUBFX are provided by The Currency Cloud Limited. Registered in England No. 06323311. Registered Office: Stewardship Building 1st Floor, 12 Steward Street London E1 6FQ. The Currency Cloud Limited is authorised by the Financial Conduct Authority under the Electronic Money Regulations 2011 for the issuing of electronic money (FRN: 900199) and The Currency Cloud Inc. which operates in partnership with Community Federal Savings Bank (CFSB) to facilitate payments in all 50 states in the US. CFSB is registered with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC Certificate# 57129). The Currency Cloud Inc is registered with FinCEN and authorized in 39 states to transmit money (MSB Registration Number: 31000160311064). Registered Office: 104 5th Avenue, 20th Floor, New York , NY 10011 and CurrencyCloud B.V.. Registered in the Netherlands No. 72186178. Registered Office: Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 296 – 298, Mindspace Nieuwezijds Office 001 Amsterdam. CurrencyCloud B.V. is authorised by the DNB under the Wet op het financieel toezicht to carry out the business of a electronic-money institution (Relation Number: R142701)

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